Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush
FaceBook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Google Plus
Loading
 
  
The Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush physicians are highly trained, experienced, and respected orthopedic physicians The leader in comprehensive orthopedic services News and Events Request an appointment with one of our orthopedic physicians About our orthopedic practice Locations, directions and hours for our five orthopedic facilities Information on our experienced orthopedic clinical staff Comprehensive orthopedic patient information Our practice publications provide timely orthopedic content for our patients IME/Workers' Compensation Appointment Scheduling
News
Clinical Trial Seeks to Determine Whether Platelet-Rich Plasma Can Ease the Pain of Osteoarthritis

March 22, 2011 - Rush University Medical Center

CHICAGO—For years, doctors have used platelet-rich plasma, or PRP, to promote healing after surgery. Now, Rush University Medical Center is studying whether PRP can help relieve knee pain in patients with mild to moderate osteoarthritis.

PRP contains growth factors that promote cell proliferation and is prepared from the patient's own blood tissue. It has received popular attention recently because of its use in treating sports injuries in professional athletes, but the jury is still out on whether it is effective.

Brian Cole, M.D.

"There have been few controlled clinical trials, and results are inconsistent, but data so far suggests that it could be a promising treatment for healing in a variety of tissues," said Dr. Brian Cole, orthopedic surgeon and head of the cartilage restoration center at Rush. "The therapy will not be a cure for osteoarthritis, but it could help put off the day when a patient will need to get a knee implant." Cole is professor of orthopedic surgery at Rush University and head team physician for the Chicago Bulls.

At present, the standard of care is either corticosteroid injections, which may provide relief for about three months, or synthetic lubricants containing hyaluronic acid, which can last for up to a year.

In the double-blind, randomized, controlled study, 100 patients will receive either hyaluronic acid or PRP. The PRP is prepared from 10 millimeters of the patient's own blood. The blood is spun in a centrifuge to separate the platelets from the red and white blood cells. The platelets are then injected into the knee joint using ultrasound imaging to guide placement.

Patients will receive three injections over three weeks and will be monitored for two years. In periodic clinical exams, the physician will assess pain and knee function. In addition, a teaspoon-size sample will be taken of the synovial fluid around the knee joint to test for molecular changes that may indicate a shift in the balance of anabolic factors that increase the buildup of tissue and catabolic factors that break it down. An imbalance in these factors has been implicated in the deterioration of cartilage that leads to osteoarthritis.

###

Copyright © 2011 Rush University Medical Center
All rights reserved
Reprinted by permission


Chicago Bulls
Chicago White Sox
DePaul Blue Demons



OrthoCentrix Solutions
bottom fade
Share this page:
Email