Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush
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Orthopedic Trauma
Orthopedic Trauma

Highly Specialized Orthopedic Trauma Services

Orthopedic trauma care covers the spectrum of simple isolated fractures to severe life threatening accidents with multiple broken bones. While many fractures can be treated very well by general orthopedic surgeons, some can benefit from fracture specialists. More significant injuries with multiple broken bones, compound fractures and fractures near a joint, and fractures of the pelvis are more difficult to treat, and benefit the most from specialized care. Additionally, problems with healing including nonunions, infections (osteomyelitis) and healing with poor alignment (malunion) are often treated by fracture specialists.

The specialists of the Orthopedic Trauma group of Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush have the unique expertise and training to treat these orthopedic injuries. Only a few select hospitals in Illinois can match these capabilities. We can typically see patients within 24 hours and/or quickly arrange hospital-to-hospital transfers.

What is Orthopedic Trauma?

Orthopedic trauma is a branch of orthopedic surgery specializing in problems related to the bones, joints, and soft tissues (muscles, tendons, ligaments) of the entire body following trauma. The main goal of this specialized area in orthopedics is the healing of the fractured bones, as well as restoring the anatomic alignment of the joint surfaces to allow for recovery and return to maximum function of the injured body part.

Our highly experienced physicians are leaders in extremity and pelvis fracture reconstruction, deformity correction, and bone transplantation. These physicians utilize many leading-edge techniques including minimally invasive surgery and advanced external fixation. The latest in bone graft substitutes and bone-forming proteins are often used to assist in the reconstruction of bones that have not healed.

Our comprehensive orthopedic trauma capabilities include:

  • Minimally invasive surgery for fractures.
  • Treatment of nonunions and malunions.
  • Pelvis and acetabulum surgery.
  • Treatment for infected fractures and osteomyelitis.
  • Limb lengthening.
  • Bone and joint transplantation.
  • Minimally invasive bone grafting.
  • Complex soft tissue reconstruction.
  • Complex upper extremity reconstruction.

Treatment Options

While not all fractures need specialized care, some complex fractures may benefit from care by a trauma specialist. At MOR, many leading-edge surgical techniques are utilized in the treatment of trauma patients, including minimally invasive surgery, advanced external fixation, and the use of bone graft substitutes and bone-forming proteins.

Nonsurgical Treatment of Trauma Injuries

Some fractures and dislocations, particularly related to the clavicle, scapula, humerus, wrist, hand, and foot, can be treated nonoperatively. Depending on the severity of the fracture, your physician may treat the injury nonsurgically through an external fixation method. This method involves the use of splints, casts, braces, and other devices on the outside of the injury to stabilize the fracture.

Surgical Treatment of Trauma Injuries

An internal fixation method is when a physician performs minor surgery to place pins, wires, screws, and plates on the bone to stabilize it. Severe injuries may require more complex surgical procedures including bone grafting, limb lengthening, and complex reconstruction.

Recovery

The length of recovery for fractures depends on the type and severity of the injury. It can take 3 weeks up to several months for a bone to completely heal, and in the worst cases the bone may never heal completely. The good news is that often times the pain from the break will subside dramatically before the bone has completely healed.

Your orthopedic physician will prescribe a progressive plan to attempt to fully restore the fractured bone to pre-injury condition. You may experience stiffness and muscle fatigue as you start in on your new program. This is caused by atrophy of the muscles, joints, and ligaments from lack of activity. Carefully follow your physician's recommendations to avoid reinjury.

For additional information about the treatment of fractures,
call 877 MD BONES (877.632.6637).












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